Engineered Wood Flooring Installation

Engineered Oak Flooring

Oak

Oak is the most used wood for flooring and many other things in many countries due to it abundance in the uk and across europe. It has been strained and  changed to create a myriad of colour and effect, to include  chemically treating to create many colour and effects. 

Pine

Pine

Pine is light to look at and is often considered to be soft wood, well quickly grown pine which is used for floor boards is soft, but there are harder species of pine which are ideal for flooring, and have been used in the past for wood block flooring. 

Beech

Beech

Beech is a worm light brown colour, junckers who are a scandinavian company with big supplies of beech have created compressed beech which they use in spots floor and because of the compression are actually  very hard.  

Ash

Ash

Ash has an alluring pale honey colour that spans from pale to creamy brown. It is known for its strength and durability hence its frequent use in shops and offices. 

Cherry

Cherry

Cherry has a delightful warmth but the colour is significantly affected by light. After a while areas exposed to light start to turn an auburn colour while those in the shade will maintain a lighter shade. 

Jarrah

Jarrah

Jarrah is a beautiful, Australian hardwood species, and is becoming an increasingly popular choice for people looking for a hardwood flooring solution for their home, but wanting to steer clear of some of the more commonly found species. 

Black Oak

black oak

Has a light to medium reddish-brown color, though there can be a fair amount of variation in color. Conversely, White Oak tends to be slightly more olive-colored, but is by no means a reliable method of determining the type of oak.

Walnut

Walnut

 is a magnificent open-grained hardwood. Its colour starts out a dark mustard colour that, within a few days, turns to a rich chocolate-brown or black. What gives it an almost magical quality is its beautiful lustre combined with a sap seam with a cat's eye effect. 

Merbau

Merbau

It is durable with an orange/brown colour when cut that darkens with age The grain is flecked with small, water soluble yellow mineral deposits that distinguish it from other species 

Mahogany

Mohogany

Mahogany, once the cabinetmakers' choice for its beauty, durability and colour. It can also be given a lustrous patina to make it look like burnished gold. It is a straight-grained, reddish-brown wood indigenous to Central and South America. These days, stocks have diminished to the extent that much of its harvesting is illegal. 

Elm

Elm

Elm only just makes it to this list of hardwoods. It has a creamy colour and an attractive grain but it does not have the durability. That doesn't mean it should not be fitted for a floor; rooms with little traffic can look a dream with an Elm floor. 

Ipe

Ipe

Ipe comes from South America and is one of the densest, hardest of woods. It is widely used for decking a it is almost impervious to insects and water. The Ipe decking at Coney Island, New York, lasted for 25 years before parts of it were replaced. 

Wenge

Wenge

Wenge comes from Central Africa and is heavy and very hard, particularly suited to floors an staircases. It has a deep brown colour so distinctive that it is used as a standard descriptive term in many colour palettes. 

Massaranduba

Massaranduba

Massaranduba is a hardwood, purple in colour, with a red heart largely forested in Brazil. Known also as Bulletwood, it is so dense that it sinks in water and, if nails are used, holes have to be drilled to accommodate the nail. 

Zebrano

Zebrano

Zebrano, known also as Zebrawood, originates in Central Africa. It is pale brown wood with a defined streaks of dark brown or black from which it gets its name. This exciting feature makes it an unusual and very striking timber for floors and staircases

Engineered Flooring Continued

Champagne Oak ...................

Champangne Oak

  • 2.075m2 per pack
  • 14x190x1860mm
  • 2 sided bevel (long edge)
  • UV brushed & oiled finish

Rustic UV Brushed & Oiled Oak

Rustic UV Brushed Oiled Oak

  • 2.075m2 per pack
  • 14x190x1820mm
  • 4 sided bevel

Rustic UV Lacquered Oak ...............

Rustic UV Lacquered Oak

  • 2.075m2 per pack
  • 14x190x1820mm
  • 4 sided bevel

Truffle Oak

Truffle Oak

 

  • 2.075m2 per pack
  • 14x190x1820mm
  • 4 sided bevel
  • UV brushed & oiled, smoked finish

Super Rustic Oak

Super Rustic Oak

 

  • 2.075m2 per pack
  • 14x190x1820mm
  • 4-sided bevel
  • UV brushed & oiled finish

Caramel Oak

Caramel Oak

 

  • 14x190x1820mm
  • 2.075m2 per pack
  • 4 sided bevel
  • UV oiled oak

Engineered flooring installation in Preston

Engineered Wood Flooring Structure

What Is Engineered Wood Flooring Made Of?

Top question asked is what is wood made off?”. In fact, engineered wood floor installation in Preston is arguably one of the most misunderstood flooring products on the market today and we think this is a real shame. better than solid wood in many ways,  it’s a flooring solution that is well worthy of consideration, yet is often confused with the likes of laminate flooring, which for us is heartbreaking! In this article we want to help you get up close and personal with engineered wood flooring so you can start to love it in the same way as we do! engineered flooring and installation in Preston engineered wood floorIng and installation in Preston


Engineered Wood Flooring Structure 2

The basic structure of engineered wood flooring

Engineered wood flooring is made up of wood between 3 and 12 layers of ply. 

The ply is layed in cross section , then glue under pressure to form a strong board.  It’s this process of glue board in opposite directions that makes engineered wood flooring so very different from solid wood flooring. 


The wood is cut into planks, then the tongue and groove are created. In fact, the more layers of ply a board has, generally speaking the tougher it will be. For example, a 3 ply board will have a single core board, a base layer and a real wood top layer or lamella.  if your you have the budget , you should choose a multi-layer board. 


How is it made?

The core board of engineered wood flooring is  bonded layers of ply together. 2nd the top layer is added and it’s this layer that really makes the end result look so good. There are two ways to make the top layer of solid wood for engineered wood flooring. The first is called rotary cutting,  and the second is called slicing or sawing.


A tree trunk is cut through a crosses section to create the veneer.  Buy cutting a thin layer from all the way around the tree trunk to create a veneer ‘sheet’ A rotary cut veneer is made. The finished product is then bonded on to the top of the core board to give its finish and incredibly good looks. 


Sliced or sawn veneer can be cut thicker than a rotary cut veneer. Although a sliced or sawn veneer gives a more natural look to the wood, if it’s a more dramatic grain effect you’re looking for, you might be best to choose a rotary cutter.

Effect of thickness

What do the different thicknesses mean?

Solid wood just like engineered wood comes in different thickness, there are 2 similarities teh wear layer and the rest of the thickness of the board,  So when we see indications of number like 18/5 or 14/3 the big number is the overall thickness of the board and the 2ns number is the thickness level. 


When you’re choosing the thickness of your board, you need to be careful to choose the best option for your project. Generally speaking, a board of more than 14mm thick isn’t recommended over under floor heating and a board of less than 18mm thick isn’t suitable for structural projects.


Species, grades and finishes

What about species, grades and finishes?

Both solid wood end engineered flooring can be laid the same way, Which shows that engineered is not sub standard but equal or even greater than solid wood.