Flooring FAQ
  1. Cork Flooring
  2. Laminate Flooring
  3. Linoleum Flooring
  4. Stone Flooring
  5. Tile Flooring
  6. Vinyl Flooring
  7. Wood Flooring

When choosing flooring, it’s imperative to think about several things: the room the flooring is going in, the type of foot traffic, wear and tear it will receive, the décor of the room and your budget. With so many things to factor in, it’s nice to know the pros and cons of each type of flooring.

Carpet

Pros
• Energy saver: Carpet can act like another layer of insulation and help keep cold or warm drafts from seeping through the floor.
• Feels great: It goes without saying that carpet is always going to be the softest of any type of flooring.
• Sound: Carpet helps to reduce sound and noises from one floor to the next.
• Durability: Manufacturers have advanced the wear, tear and durability of carpet for it to last longer with proper care.

Cons
• Maintenance: Regular vacuuming is needed (every one to two days for high traffic areas) frequently. Spills need to be removed immediately to prevent staining and liquid to seep deep into fibers to cause mold and mildew. Carpets also need regular professional carpet cleaning to remove ground in dirt and grime.

Hardwood

Pros
• Value: An upgrade to hardwood floors will add a lot of value to your home.
• Durability: When hardwood floors are properly cared for, they will last a very long time. When the floors are worn down some, a little TLC can bring them back to their natural glory.
• Maintenance: Hardwood floors are easy to care for by sweeping or vacuuming them daily and wiping them with an approved wood cleaner.
• Variety: There are many different types of woods, stains and plank sizes.

Cons
• Cost: Hardwood floors can be a substantial expense to have installed.
• Cold: They can be colder to the touch compared to other flooring options.
• Noise and not so pet-friendly: Every step that is taken on wood floors can be heard. Not to mention, furry friends can slip and slide because their padded feet can’t grip the shiny, smooth surface.

Laminate

Pros
• Installation: Many manufacturers make a “Click-Lock” design that makes it extremely easy to install. With laminate flooring, you should be able to use all the pieces in a box, unlike hardwood flooring products.
• Cleanup: The protective layer on laminate helps protect it from something that would normally stain easily.
• Maintenance: Vacuum away loose dirt and debris and mop with a damp mop.

Cons
• Value: Laminate may look like hardwood, but doesn’t have the same value.
• Feel: There are many negative ways people describe laminate flooring, “Loud, slippery, hard, etc.” Some laminate flooring can be very slippery, too.
• Maintenance: Laminate flooring is easily dented. Laminate flooring cannot be sanded or refinished. Areas with large scratches or gouges need to be replaced with new laminate flooring.

Luxury vinyl tile
Pros
• Design choices: There are many unique variety of colors and designs, inspired by the colors and patterns found in nature. Tiles can be grouted to make it look more like ceramic or stone.
• Quick installation: A typical installation can be completed in half the time it takes to complete a comparable ceramic tile installation.
• Durability: Luxury vinyl tile is highly durable and scratch-resistant, making it an excellent choice for heavy foot traffic areas.
• Feel: LVT is comparatively warmer to the touch than ceramic and other natural stones. It also absorbs sound and creates a more peaceful atmosphere.
• Maintenance: Regular sweeping, vacuuming and mopping can maintain this flooring for many years.

Cons
• Cost: Don’t think inexpensive vinyl flooring or “peel and stick” tiles. Luxury vinyl tile can cost as much as some standard hardwood or ceramic tile.
• Transitions: Manufacturers need to address transitions, as the only option right now is staining unfinished wood pieces to match.

Become an educated buyer when shopping for flooring. Don’t rely on big box stores and their associates to provide you with all the information you need. Many times, the products they sell are of lesser quality.

In order to become educated on quality flooring, it’s recommended you go to a reputable flooring showroom where all types (with many price points) are displayed. Associates at a “flooring only” store will be able to share their knowledge and help you choose the product that will suit your family, home, decor and lifestyle.

What is it?

Laminate flooring is a compressed fibreboard plank, covered by a photographic image of wood, stone or tile, with a protective overlay.

How much?

Prices start at £3 per sq m, but the cheapest kinds are smooth and appear relatively unrealistic. Bevelled edges, a more varied set of photos and embossed features, such as knots, give higher-priced versions of brands, such as QuickStep (about £13-£32 per sq m) and Pergo (about £18-£49 per sq m), a more natural look and texture.

Where to lay it?

Living areas, studies and playrooms. Some products include a waterproof core, which manufacturers claim are suitable for bathrooms and kitchens. If you’re thinking of tackling these rooms, see our guides to planning a kitchen and planning a bathroom. If you do intend to lay laminate flooring in these rooms, check the guarantee carefully before buying to ensure you won’t breach the stringent conditions.

  • Pros  It’s cheap and hardwearing. Click-lock designs are simple to install. A wide variety of imitations of natural materials are available.
  • Cons  Even the best laminate flooring won’t look or feel exactly like the real thing. The joins wear over time, and once the surface is damaged it’s hard to fix. It’s easily swollen by moisture, and the damage can’t be repaired. Poorly laid laminate is a turn-off for homebuyers

Choosing commercial flooring can be difficult, with such a wide range of flooring types available. Each type of commercial flooring creates a different aesthetic and has a huge impact on the indoor environment.

Today we’re comparing the pros and cons of seven common commercial flooring types, to help you select the option that’s the best fit for your organization.

LAMINATE WOOD FLOORING

  • PROS
    Aesthetics – Laminate flooring is a popular flooring choice thanks to its close resemblance to solid wood flooring.
    Price – While laminate wood flooring can create a similar aesthetic to solid wood flooring, it does so at a much lower price point. This means it’s a much more accessible flooring option for organisations wanting the slick look of wood flooring.
  • CONS
    Acoustics – One major drawback of laminate flooring is its poor acoustic profile – even compared with other types of hard surface flooring. This is a particular concern in open plan office spaces, where elevated noise levels can negatively impact productivity and employee happiness.
    Susceptible to Moisture – Laminate flooring has a powdered wood core, which makes it prone to warp and buckle if exposed to moisture – either through cleaning or from the subfloor. You will need to take extra care when cleaning laminate flooring, to minimize the risk of moisture damage.

ENGINEERED HARDWOOD FLOORING

  • PROS
    Better Moisture Resistance – Some types of wood flooring are very susceptible to moisture damage. Unlike laminate flooring or solid wood flooring, engineered hardwood flooring doesn’t expand or contract as much when it comes into contact with moisture, meaning it’s less likely to warp, crack or buckle.
    Aesthetics – The top layer of engineered hardwood flooring is real hardwood, so you can create an aesthetic that’s identical to solid wood flooring.
  • CONS
    Easily Damaged – The wood layer of engineered hardwood is easily damaged, because there’s nothing to protect the surface from wear and tear. Moving furniture, dropping items, or simply walking in high heels can lead to the surface becoming scratched, scuffed or indented.
    Price – Compared with other alternatives to solid wood flooring, engineered hardwood is one of the most expensive options. Not only is the purchase price higher, it will also be more expensive to clean and maintain over its lifetime, as the wood layer will require the same careful cleaning and maintenance as solid wood flooring.

FAQ LAMINATE FLOORING

  1. Glued laminate flooring
  2. Pre–glued laminate flooring3.
  3. Underlayment attached
  4. 4.Glue-less laminate flooring
Pros
  • Easy DIY installation
  • Inexpensive
  • Good stain resistance
  • Non-allergenic
Cons
  • Susceptible to moisture damage
  • “Fake” appearance
  • Hard and noisy underfoot
  • Some chemicals present

What is it?

Laminate flooring is a compressed fibreboard plank, covered by a photographic image of wood, stone or tile, with a protective overlay.

How much?

Prices start at £3 per sq m, but the cheapest kinds are smooth and appear relatively unrealistic. Bevelled edges, a more varied set of photos and embossed features, such as knots, give higher-priced versions of brands, such as QuickStep (about £13-£32 per sq m) and Pergo (about £18-£49 per sq m), a more natural look and texture.

Where to lay it?

Living areas, studies and playrooms. Some products include a waterproof core, which manufacturers claim are suitable for bathrooms and kitchens. If you’re thinking of tackling these rooms, see our guides to planning a kitchen and planning a bathroom. If you do intend to lay laminate flooring in these rooms, check the guarantee carefully before buying to ensure you won’t breach the stringent conditions.

  • Pros  It’s cheap and hardwearing. Click-lock designs are simple to install. A wide variety of imitations of natural materials are available.
  • Cons  Even the best laminate flooring won’t look or feel exactly like the real thing. The joins wear over time, and once the surface is damaged it’s hard to fix. It’s easily swollen by moisture, and the damage can’t be repaired. Poorly laid laminate is a turn-off for homebuyers

Choosing commercial flooring can be difficult, with such a wide range of flooring types available. Each type of commercial flooring creates a different aesthetic and has a huge impact on the indoor environment.

Today we’re comparing the pros and cons of seven common commercial flooring types, to help you select the option that’s the best fit for your organization.

LAMINATE WOOD FLOORING

  • PROS
    Aesthetics – Laminate flooring is a popular flooring choice thanks to its close resemblance to solid wood flooring.
    Price – While laminate wood flooring can create a similar aesthetic to solid wood flooring, it does so at a much lower price point. This means it’s a much more accessible flooring option for organisations wanting the slick look of wood flooring.
  • CONS
    Acoustics – One major drawback of laminate flooring is its poor acoustic profile – even compared with other types of hard surface flooring. This is a particular concern in open plan office spaces, where elevated noise levels can negatively impact productivity and employee happiness.
    Susceptible to Moisture – Laminate flooring has a powdered wood core, which makes it prone to warp and buckle if exposed to moisture – either through cleaning or from the subfloor. You will need to take extra care when cleaning laminate flooring, to minimize the risk of moisture damage.

ENGINEERED HARDWOOD FLOORING

  • PROS
    Better Moisture Resistance – Some types of wood flooring are very susceptible to moisture damage. Unlike laminate flooring or solid wood flooring, engineered hardwood flooring doesn’t expand or contract as much when it comes into contact with moisture, meaning it’s less likely to warp, crack or buckle.
    Aesthetics – The top layer of engineered hardwood flooring is real hardwood, so you can create an aesthetic that’s identical to solid wood flooring.
  • CONS
    Easily Damaged – The wood layer of engineered hardwood is easily damaged, because there’s nothing to protect the surface from wear and tear. Moving furniture, dropping items, or simply walking in high heels can lead to the surface becoming scratched, scuffed or indented.
    Price – Compared with other alternatives to solid wood flooring, engineered hardwood is one of the most expensive options. Not only is the purchase price higher, it will also be more expensive to clean and maintain over its lifetime, as the wood layer will require the same careful cleaning and maintenance as solid wood flooring.